Course Descriptions

Not all the courses listed below are offered in any given year.

Greek Language & Literature

AP/GK 1000 6.0 ELEMENTARY CLASSICAL GREEK
This course is designed for those who have little or no training in Classical Greek. In this course, students acquire the fundamentals of reading Classical Greek through practice with translation, vocabulary, grammar, syntax, composition, and pronunciation. At the end of this course, students are able to go on to AP/GK 2000 6.0, the second-year Classical Greek course at York University.

PREREQUISITE: None. No previous knowledge of the language is assumed. No one who has completed an upper-level university Classical Greek course may enroll in this course. No one may enroll in this course and an upper-level Classical Greek course simultaneously.

AP/GK 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE CLASSICAL AND BIBLICAL GREEK
The course concentrates on building knowledge of grammar and vocabulary with the aim of reading passages in original Greek by the end of the year. The first part of the course consists of review of grammar and vocabulary presented in Greek 1000, the second part of the course completes the first-year textbook, and the third part of the course introduces continuous passages of original Greek.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 1000 6.0 or AP/GK 1400 6.0 or the equivalent with a grade of C+ or higher.

AP/GK 3030 3.0A/AP/GK 4030 3.0A GREEK EPIC POETRY
Readings from Homer's Iliad and Odyssey.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.00 or permission of director of classical studies.

AP/GK 3080 3.0M and AP/GK 4030 3.0M LATER GREEK PROSE
PREREQUISITE: AP/GK 2000 6.00 or permission of director of classical studies.

AP/GK 4130 3.0/6.0 GUIDED READINGS IN GREEK AUTHORS
An independent reading program with material chosen in accordance with the interest of the student. PREREQUISITE: Six credits of Ancient Greek at the 3000 level and permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies programme.

AP/GK 4140 6.0 HONOURS ESSAY
Open only to Honours candidates in Classics, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies. PREREQUISITE: Six credits of Ancient Greek at the 3000 level and permission of the Coordinator of the Classical Studies programme.

History

AP/HIST 3125 3.0 (W) SPORT & SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE
This course studies the place of athletic competition in ancient Greek society, with a particular focus on the Archaic and Classical periods and on the Panhellenic games, of which the Olympic Games were the most important.

AP/HIST 4122 6.0A WAR & SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE
This course examines the phenomenon of war in ancient Greece, with particular emphasis on its social impact, concentrating on the late Archaic and Classical periods (650-338 BC).

This course is restricted to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 AND AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

AP/HIST 4140 6.0A PROBLEMS IN HELLENISTIC HISTORY
Selected topics in one or more areas of concentration in the history of the Mediterranean world of Alexander the Great and his successors. This course is restricted to History, Classical Studies or Hellenic Studies Honours majors and minors who have successfully completed at least 84 credits.

Prerequisites: AP/HIST 2100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3100 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3102 3.00 or AP/HUMA 3104 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3105 6.00 or AP/HUMA 3110 6.00 and AP/HIST 3120 6.00 or AP/HIST 3125 3.00 or AP/HIST 3130 6.00 or AP/HIST 3131 6.00 or AP/HIST 3135 3.00 or AP/HIST 3140 3.00 or AP/HIST 3150 6.00 or AP/HIST 3152 6.00 or AP/HIST 3153 6.00 or AP/HIST 3154 3.00 or AP/HIST 3160 6.00 or departmental permission.

Humanities

AP/HUMA 2110 9.0 EGYPT IN THE GREEK & ROMAN MEDITERRANEAN
Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

An examination of Egypt and Egyptians in the imagination and history of the cultures of the Greek and Roman Mediterranean. The place of Egypt in the imagination of the cultures of the Greek and Roman Mediterranean was an important and pervasive fact of both ancient myth and history. Athenians from the Golden Age, Jews from Judea, Alexander the son of Philip, Roman warriors like Caesar and Antonius became directly involved in the life of Egypt of their own day and fascinated by the monumental and exotic features of Egyptian culture.

What they heard and saw made its way into the cultural narratives and even the reconstructed histories of the visitors. Many visitors stayed and provided in turn a fertile home for many important cultural and ritual events of the ancient Mediterranean. The Judean sections of Alexandria, Macedonian monarchs like Cleopatra Philopator, native and imported poets, scientists and scholars contributed to the rich mixture of Egyptian cultures and, in turn, informed the Greek and Roman culture of the rest of the Mediterranean.

This course seeks to examine carefully the details of the imaginative and complicated portraits of Egypt and Egyptians fashioned in a variety of cultures around the Greek and Roman Mediterranean and to compare these to the rich remains and narratives created by Egyptians themselves over three millennia of monuments, artifacts and written records. Students are required to become familiar both with the Egyptians of the Greek and Roman Mediterranean and with the Egyptians who stood behind these artistic and cultural events.

AP/HUMA 2830 9.0 FOUNDERS OF CHRISTIANITY
An introduction to the literature and history of the early Christian communities in Palestine, Syria, Asia Minor, Greece and Rome. The varieties of early Christian thought and practice are examined in terms of their religious, cultural and political contexts.

Note: This course has been approved in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies for general education credit.

Course credit exclusions: None.

PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusion: AS/HUMA 2830 9.00.

AP/HUMA 3100 6.0A GREEK DRAMA AND CULTURE
A survey of ancient Greek drama in translation. The plays will be looked at mainly in terms of structure, of religious thought, and of political expression.

AP/HUMA 3105 6.0A GREEK AND ROMAN RELIGION
This course explores literary and archeological evidence for practices associated with honouring the gods in the Hellenistic and Roman worlds. We will be attentive to variations in practice and belief from one locale to another and from one level of society to another.

AP/HUMA 3115 6.0A MYTH IN ANCIENT GREECE: TEXTS AND THEORIES
This course examines Greek myths of gods and heroes in their social, religious and historical contexts through close reading of primary texts and visual representations and through analysis of modern comparative, psychoanalytical and structuralist theories.

Philosophy

AP/PHIL 2010 3.0 ORIGINS OF WESTERN PHILOSOPHY (FALL)
An examination of the origin and early development of western philosophy. The works of the first philosophers, the Pre-Socratic, will be introduced and contextualized, providing an indispensable background to Plato and Aristotle, and the continuing development of philosophy.

AP/PHIL 2015 3.0 PLATO AND ARISTOTLE (WINTER)
Plato and Aristotle are two of the pillars of philosophy. This course will introduce students to some of their most influential theses and works with a special emphasis on Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Students will also be introduced to the question of how and why their two opposite approaches to philosophy, rationalism and empiricism, still divide philosophers today.

AP/PHIL 3600 3.0 ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (FALL)
Plato's Republic is the first known systematic account of an utopian society in western literature. It is arguably the most influential and famous philosophical and political treatise ever written. The Republic expounds Plato's conception of the perfectly just state (the standard against which all other states, in his eyes, can be judged to be just or unjust). In this course we will examine the background, structure and arguments of the Republic.

PREREQUISITE: At least one of: AS/PHIL 2010 3.0 or AS/PHIL 2015 3.0

AP/PHIL 4030 3.0 SEMINAR IN ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY (WINTER)
This seminar course closely examines an important work of one of the great ancient philosophers. Alternatively, it may also focus on an important area or theme of ancient philosophy including, metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and political theory. This year, the course will focus on the notion of poetic inspiration from Homer to Plato.

PREREQUISITE: At least 9 credits in Philosophy.

Ancillary Courses for Hellenic Studies

**The following courses are largely, but not exclusively, concerned with the Hellenic world. No more than the equivalent of TWO full courses (12 credits) may satisfy degree requirements in Hellenic Studies

AP/HIST 2100 6.0 ANCIENT GREECE & ROME
This course offers a general introduction to the history of ancient Greece and Rome. It surveys the ancient world from the Greek Bronze Age in the second millennium B.C. until the fall of the Western Roman Empire in the fifth century A.D. Specific periods are studied with emphasis on the social, economic, and political history of each. Extensive use is made of primary sources (in translation), with special attention devoted to the evaluation of literary, archaeological, and documentary evidence.

Among the areas covered are Homeric society, the development of the polis in archaic and classical Greece, Athenian society in the fifth and fourth centuries B.C., the rise of Rome, politics and society in late Republican Rome, and the society, economy, and political structure of the Roman Empire. Texts, read in translation, typically include a selection of the following: Homer, Odyssey; the histories of Herodotus and Thucydides; selected Greek plays, law-court orations, and documentary inscriptions; Plutarch's lives of eminent Romans; speeches of Cicero; the historical works of Sallust and Tacitus; Petronius, Satyricon and letters of Pliny.

AP/HIST 2110 6.0 ANCIENT NEAR EAST
Civilization began in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq) and then Egypt. Shortly thereafter, civilizations developed all over the Near East (modern Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Turkey, and Iran). This course surveys major developments in the political, social, and cultural history of the peoples and states of this region. In broad terms, the area covered by this course extends from the eastern Mediterranean to the Iranian plateau, and the time span ranges from about 3000 B.C. to the invasion of Alexander, some 2700 years later.

Major peoples and states studied include Sumer, Akkad, Egypt, Assyria, Babylonia, the Hittites, Israel, and Persia, but not all these groups and not all their history will receive equal emphasis. History 2110 also investigates how we determine historical facts, especially the facts of ancient history. In this connection, we discuss problems and possibilities in the fields of archaeology, text interpretation, and historical geography, to name but three.

AP/HIST 4010 6.0 COLLOQUIUM IN ANCIENT GREEK & ROMAN HISTORY
Advanced colloquium on selected topics in Ancient Greek and/or Roman History. Topics vary from year to year. Please consult the Department of History supplemental calendar for further details.

AP/HUMA 1105 9.0 MYTH & IMAGINATION IN GREECE & ROME
Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

The mythical narratives of the ancient Greeks and the Romans constitute a continuous tradition that extends from before the reach of history to the present day. Myths survive in literary texts and visual art because their narratives have continued proved compelling and fascinating in different languages, historical eras, and social contexts (the myths of Odysseus, Heracles, and Oedipus are just a few examples).

Literature and art of all kinds have been inspired to retell and represent their stories, while the search for the meaning of mythic stories has informed and profoundly influenced a great range of intellectual disciplines including literary criticism, anthropology, and psychoanalysis. In these ways, myths have and continue to exercise a fundamental influence on western culture and, in consequence, even today they maintain a certain cozy familiarity. On the other hand, the historical contexts in which the Greeks and Romans told and retold these mythical narratives are to us in the twenty-first century culturally alien and unfamiliar.

The aim of the course is two-fold: insofar as Greek and Roman culture is fundamental to the development of western culture, students will achieve a deeper historical understanding of the latter; yet because the world of the Greeks and Romans is in many ways radically different to our own, students will develop the conceptual tools for comprehending another culture and so enhance their ability to understand and critique their own cultures. The course is also one of the Foundations courses and as such is intended to provide students with a solid grounding for undergraduate study by cultivating generally applicable and transferable skills; these include the development of clear and logical academic writing, critical and analytical skills for reading and understanding texts, constructive participation in group discussion and debate (in tutorials), and basic methods and techniques of research.

AP/HUMA 1110 9.0 GREEK & BIBLICAL TRADITIONS
Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

A study of early Mesopotamian, Greek, Jewish and Christian literature (1) to understand its original meanings and (2) to explore its relevance to our search for personal ethical norms, images of female and male, models of the just society and conceptions of transcendent reality. The course aims to teach students methods of literary criticism, textual interpretation, historical inquiry, conceptual analysis, and cross-cultural comparisons.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/HUMA 1710 6.0; AK/HUMA 1710 6.0, AS/HUMA 1110 9.0.

AP/HUMA 1115 9.0 TRANSFORMATION OF ANCIENT LITERATURE
Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

Many great writers have reused the literature of the past in order to create new works of art. In order to understand the works of Shakespeare, Milton, Racine, Montaigne, Sartre, and Shaw, among others, we need to know how they refashioned and transformed the works of classical authors, such as Aeschylus Sophocles, Euripides, Seneca, and Plutarch. This course examines works of literature from ancient Greece and Rome and modern adaptations of those works.

Particular attention will be paid to changes linked to differences in religion, politics, and social structure. Topics may include Comedy, Tragedy, Satire, Essays, and Fables. Works may include Sophocles' Antigone and Anouilh's Antigone: Plautus' Amphitryo and Giradoux's Amphitryon; Aeschylus' Agamemnon and James M. Cain's The Postman Always Rings Twice; Sophocles' Oedipus the King and Robert Heinlein's Double Star. There will also be some attention to the use of classical themes in visual art. Because this is a Foundations course, there will also be attention to the development of critical skills and writing.

AP/HUMA 1710 6.0 THE ROOTS OF WESTERN CULTURE
Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

This course begins by considering the look back into such ancient times when stories were reworked and transmitted for generations through oral culture, and orienting students to the emerging cultural identities of the ancient Greek and ancient Hebrews.

For example we will study the documentary hypothesis which suggests that the Hebrew Bible is a composite work from several sources, and we will consider how our knowledge of "the Greeks" is often based on scant physical remains, fragmentary literary sources dependent on second and third hand authors, and is always interpretative. Students will be introduced to many kinds of literature which emerged in the ancient period: epic poetry, lyric poetry, fables and parables, dramatic works, philosophical and medical treatises and historical prose. We will want to engage in close readings of primary texts with a view to understanding key themes and ideas, historical, political, and social contexts, and religious beliefs and practices.

Thus, along the way, we might consider parallels to, and influences from, even more ancient civilizations; highlight certain Greek gods and goddess and their festivals; and, consider the social status of women, or cultural differences between the Spartans and Athenians. We will always want to engage with the texts critically which will involve examining the perspectives of ancient authors, the use of art and literature for ideological ends, as well as our own assumptions about the past.

In addition to excerpts from the Old and New Testament, we will engage with a number of Greek and Roman authors which will include many of the following: Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aesop, Aeschylus, Aristophanes, Pythagoras, Plato, Herodotus, Thucydides, Hippocrates, Livy, Virgil, Lucretius, Epicurus, Epictetus, Apuleius and Ovid. It was in the climate of the Roman world that the two major stands of Western thought, the Greco-Roman and Judeo–Christian, came together. After having spent some time on Archaic and Classical Greek writers, we will examine the adoption of Greek culture by the Romans who gave it their own personality. We will end the course with a look at the early Christian authors as they attempted to distinguish themselves both from the Law of the Jews and Greco-Roman polytheism.

Modern Greek Language

AP/GKM 1000 6.0 INTRODUCTORY MODERN GREEK
This course teaches the fundamentals of modern Greek: the writing system, pronunciation and some practice in simple conversation and writing.

PREREQUISITE: None. Not open to students who obtained their high school 'apolytirion' from Greece or Cyprus; not open to students who have University Preparation Level 4 High School or OAC in Modern Greek. Instructor may give special permission to enroll in this course to those students whose level of knowledge of Modern Greek is insufficient to function at the intermediate level.

AP/GKM 2000 6.0 INTERMEDIATE MODERN GREEK
This course is designed to improve the students' oral and written command of Modern Greek. Short texts relevant to Modern Greek culture will be analyzed for their content and style.

PREREQUISITE: AS/GKM1000 6.0 or AP/GKM1000 6.0; University Preparation Level 4 High School or OAC in Modern Greek or equivalent; or permission of the instructor.

AP/GKM 4600 6.0 MODERN GREEK LITERATURE AND CULTURE
A general survey of the development of Greek literature and culture from the early 19th century to the present, as they relate to contemporary Modern Greek consciousness.

CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/GK 3450 6.0; AK/GK 3450 6.0.

PREREQUISITE: AP/GKM 2000 6.0 (formerly AK/GK 2430 6.0 or AP/GK 2430 6.0) or permission of the instructor. With the permission of the instructor students may co-enroll in AP/GKM 2000 6.0 and AP/GKM 3600 6.0.

Modern Greek History

AP/HIST 3357 6.0 GREECE, A MODERN HISTORY (HIST 3357 – Flyer for Summer 2016 – pdf)

AP/HIST 3385 Empires and colonialism in the Modern Mediterranean
This course introduces students to modern Mediterranean history through the colonial expansion of Britain, France and Italy from the late eighteenth nineteenth until the middle of the twentieth century. The end of the colonial era in the Mediterranean came when nationalist uprisings and movements gave rise to independent, post-colonial states in North Africa and the Middle East. The course will introduce students to the debates on the beginnings of modernization in the Mediterranean, North Africa and the Middle East and to debates on de-colonization and the unity of the Mediterranean.

The course will build on the students' knowledge of modern European history and expand on the history of main European countries as colonial powers in the Mediterranean. The course will compare different forms of rule and colonial practices introduced by the colonial powers and will offer students the opportunity to specialize in the history of French, British or Italian colonization in the Mediterranean.

The course highlights major events in world history: from Napoleon's campaign in Egypt to the colonization of Mediterranean islands and North Africa, the First and Second World Wars, de- colonization and the Suez Crisis, and the emergence of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Overall, the course introduces students to such concepts as 'orientalism', 'power', 'resistance', 'collaboration' and 'post-colonialism' in the Mediterranean historical context; it is expected that students will also want to discuss recent developments in North Africa and the Middle East.